The 5 Things You Should Know When Buying a Bird

It’s your first day in the pet shop, and your eyes scan the store for your new companion. You might think that dogs can be adventurous or that cats can be low-maintenance. Yet your eyes meet something else and you smile with a sudden realization.

You want a bird.

Becoming a bird owner may seem like a way to make you stand out from the rest of the crowd, and in a way it does. However, taking care of a bird is a bit different than walking your dog or watching over your cat. It requires deep dedication and research on your part.

Such as…

1. What Breed to Get

You wouldn’t go to a pet store and buy any random dog or cat, right? You would want to know about the breed, its personality, and any drawbacks that may come with it. The same scenario applies when you get a bird. Not all birds are the same, as some are friendlier than others.

As a first-time bird owner, you may want a bird that’s on the more easygoing side. Cockatiels, for instance, are good social birds for kids and adults while conures are curious creatures with a loud squawk and a long lifespan. Think about your lifestyle and which bird can help complement it. Talk to your pet owner to see which species is ready to flock with you.

2. Dietary Restrictions

Birds have a distinct diet that ensures proper health and feature strength. What they eat can be dependent on their species, but for the most part bird diets can be divided into these categories:
Plant-eating (florivores)
Grain or seed eating (granivores)
Fruit-eating (frugivores)
Nectar-eating (nectavores)
All of the above (omnivores)
For example, the Blue-throated Macaw may eat mostly fruit, but that doesn’t mean that every bird is going to be comfortable eating berries. It’s important for you to research what type of food your future bird will eat to avoid any complications.

3. Molting

Unlike cats and dogs, birds do not have fur to shed. You might be thinking that they are cleaner creatures due to this, but on the contrary. While birds do not shed, they do undergo a process called molting, where worn-out feathers are shed in place of new features. It’s a process that can last weeks or even years depending on what type of bird you have.

That’s not cause for alarm, but it does require you to be vigilant about their care once the molting process begins.Specifically, a poor diet during molting can affect new feather health and cause abnormalities. Taking proper care of your bird during molting means that they will be rewarded with beautiful feathers and you’ll have a happier flying companion as a result.

4. Space to Live

Birds are among the most mobile pets you can have and require a lot of space to roam free. When considering what type of cage to get for your bird, you need to think about two things: the size of the cage and the space between its bars. You should optimally go for the largest size you can afford and reasonably accommodate into your home, and nifty charts like this can help you figure out what you’re looking for based on your species of bird.

Not only do you need to figure out how big the cage needs to be, you also should think about smaller details about its design that can impact your bird’s enjoyment. For example, larger birds may need bars that run horizontally in order to climb and navigate. Stainless steel designs are easy to clean while round cages can make birds claustrophobic. The main thing to remember is that you’re not just buying a container to transport your new pet, you’re also buying their home and should be treated as such.

5. Time to Fly

Without sounding obvious, birds need to be able to fly, especially if they are going to be domesticated pets. Not only does flying give birds much needed exercise that goes beyond just walking around in a cage, but it is vital for their emotional health. Flying in a safe, open area can reduce the tendency in birds to harm themselves due to stress.

This does not mean that flying is as simple as letting it free inside your home. Birds require positive reinforcement training just like you would for a puppy, and that extends to flight. Training your bird about acceptable and unacceptable flying behavior makes it safer for it to fly inside your home. With enough practice and patience, you can even train your bird to fly outside and feel greater freedom.

Owning a bird may seem daunting as a beginner, but your life will improve tremendously for it. From having a quirky companion to seeing the beauty of flight up close, you can rest easy in your decision. If you follow the steps above when thinking about your future bird, you’ll be taking home a flying friend that’s eager to be in your home.

Sources:
www.petmd.com/bird/slideshows/8-most-popular-pet-birds
www.petcoach.co/article/bird-nutrition-feeding-pet-birds-parrot-diets-and-nutrition
www.thespruce.com/importance-of-molting-386470
www.bird-cage.com/how-to-select-a-bird-cage
spring2017.iaabcjournal.org/birds-need-fly

The 5 Things You Should Know Before Getting a Cat

You’ve seen them on the internet, you’ve seen them on Instagram, and you’ve seen them walking down the street. You may even know friends or family who have one (or two) but didn’t really think to get one.

Until now.

What you’re thinking of getting is a cat, a lovable furry companion that has enough calmness yet character to keep you entertained for years. However, cats are unique animals in the way you feed, interact, and take care of them, and your actions could mean the difference between having a lifetime of comfort or ounces of misery. If you’re a first-time cat owner, there are quite a few things you need to know before you buy or adopt a feline friend.

1. Consider Which Personality Type You’re Getting

Cats are like any creature in that they can vary in breed, but they can also vary in personality. According to research from the University of South Australia, there are five different personality types demonstrated in cats:
Skittish
Outgoing
Dominant
Spontaneous
Friendly
These traits give cats their own flair and character and can mirror well with their owner, but it can also lead to behavior issues. For example, skittish cats can be very anti-social and run away from guests, while spontaneous cats can act without reason, leading to stress. If you’re buying or adopting an older cat, check with the previous owner to see what traits it exhibited.

2. Kitten and Adult Cats Require Different Things

If you’re a parent, then you know how raising a baby is different than raising a child or teenager. The same thing applies to kittens and cats. While both are wonderful additions to your family, deciding which one to get is going to depend on your lifestyle. Kittens are still getting used to the world around them and require nurturing and patience. Once a cat is older, it becomes more independent and self-reliant, so it will be comfortable being left alone for hours on end (provided that you give it food and water). So, knowing how much time you can invest in your pet when you first get it is very critical.

3. Get the Right Food (And Avoid the Wrong Ones)

Shopping for cat food can be daunting if you’ve never had a cat before, but understanding their diet can go a long way towards saving money and health issues. It’s recommended that cats eat wet food over dry food because of the added moisture, but the food itself poses some extra variables. Whole animal protein should be the first thing listed in the ingredients list if you are choosing to feed your cat manufactured food.

That’s not to say that cats can eat human food, but it becomes even more tricky. Cats can enjoy food with fat in it in moderation, and favorites like eggs and cooked poultry can give your furry feline some additional vitamins and protein.

4. Cats Sleep…A Lot.

Cats are very active pets, but only during certain hours of the day. They’re considered crepuscular, meaning that most of their activity is reserved for dawn and dusk hours. Even then, they can adapt their sleeping schedule to their feeding schedule, so knowing when you are able to feed your cat throughout the day can give you a general idea of their active hours. Still, don’t be surprised to see your new cat sleep for many hours on end, as it is completely normal.

5. Your Home is Their Home Now…Fix It.

Many first-time pet owners, including cat owners, think that getting a new pet means that you can keep your home the way it is. However, just like bringing a baby into your home for the first time, bringing a cat into the home requires a few changes of scenery. Cats can be adventurous in a new setting, so you have to consider which things might be attractive to them to play with or bite on.

Cords, blinds, and sewing equipment can be alluring to your cat, so you should put those out of sight in order to avoid them playing with it or panicking after getting tangled up. Plants like lilies and tulips need to be away from eating distance, and windows and balconies should be closed to prevent falling. Think about the things valuable to you in your home, and think about how valuable your new cat is to you now.

Cats are lovable, playful creatures ready to be welcomed into your home, but it requires work and patience if it’s your first time. Understand what type of cat you’re getting, what diet they need, and the home life you’re building for them. Once you do, you’re all set for a fun feline friend!

Sources:

Your Cat Fits One of These 5 Personality Types — Which One?


https://www.cuteness.com/13708962/what-do-cats-like-to-eat
https://www.petmd.com/cat/behavior/evr_ct_why_do_cats_sleep_so_much
https://www.vets-now.com/2017/01/cat-proof-your-house/

Make Your Life Soar with Exotic Birds

Owning a pet can be a wonderful thing. They can be companions, entertaining us for days when we’re happy and pulling us up when we’re down. But what if you want something other than a cat or dog? What if you want something a little more…exotic?

An exotic bird is not the most typical pet, but it can be a benefit for the typical owner. Owning an exotic bird can be fulfilling in many ways, including…

Having Something Social to Be Around

Exotic birds can be friendly creatures to owners and their guests. From the Yellow-thighed caique to the Blue-fronted Amazon, these birds enjoy having a home that fosters interaction and play. Others have the ability to talk if trained properly, like the Indian Ringneck or the African Grey which can create full, clear sentences. If you’re somebody who may be new to an area or wouldn’t mind an extra buddy, exotic birds can be your new friend.

Fostering a Healthy Lifestyle

Birds require a very particular environment, specifically in regards to air quality. They are sensitive to smoke and potential toxins in the home. Taking care of an exotic bird can improve your quality of life by causing you to give up certain bad habits, such as smoking. In addition, their diet can include fruits like apples and cherries along with common nuts. This may prompt you to buy similar food as a way to save money and be more conscious about what you take in as a pet owner. As a result, you both can soar with happier, healthier lives.

Making You Smarter

Exotic birds like the cockatoo are very intelligent, both in play and movement. Training them is not an easy feat and requires a lot of patience and know-how. The process itself is rewarding for both of you, as you will have to rely on critical thinking and strategic behavior reinforcement to make sure you get the results you want out of your training. Plus, you have the added benefit of doing research about your bird, giving you greater insight and appreciation for it along your journey.

Having a Great Conversation Starter

According to a 2017 study by the National Pet Owners Association, 68% of households in the U.S. own a pet. From that percentage, 7.9 million homes own a bird. If you consider that only a portion of those homes owns exotic birds specifically, then you may have something that other people do not have. This can be a great ice breaker for new friends or a story starter for longtime guests eager to know how your flying friend is doing. Maybe it can even cause more people to buy their own exotic bird, which is always a plus!

Building Lifelong Adventures

These magnificent creatures can have a long lifespan. Some, like the budgies, can live for 5-7 years; others, like the Amazon, have the chance to live as many as 60 years. No matter which exotic bird you have, they can be with you for a lifetime, bringing you adventures daily with a flair that dogs and cats may lack.

Whether you’re a fan of flight or want to spread your wings socially, owning an exotic bird can be a rewarding experience as a pet owner. You may think that you’re changing the bird’s life, but it’ll change yours for the better.

Sources:
m.petmd.com/bird/top_tens/evr_bd_top10talking_birds?page=1
www.avianwelfare.org/issues/articles/NBD_shelters_before_adopting.pdf
www.iii.org/fact-statistic/facts-statistics-pet-statistics
exoticbirdevents.com/How-Long-Do-Birds-Live.html

Scales Beat Fur: Why Exotic Reptiles Rule as Pets

Pet owners, what do you feel is the hardest part about having an animal companion? Is it the feeding, lifestyle, or training? Does cleaning up after it make you groan and sigh? What if you had a pet that was not just a good pet, but a fantastic pet?

Welcome to the wild world of exotic reptiles! Many may say that having lizards and snakes as pets are not for the faint of heart, but maybe these seven reasons will show you that your heart is bigger than you thought.

Take Your Pet Anywhere

Reptiles, especially exotic ones, need a very particular place to sleep, eat, and move around. For the most part, they are better left in an enclosure suited for their size. This may seem like a negative to those who prefer having pets free and out in the open. However, having a reptile in a portable enclosure or small habitat can mean taking them anywhere you want without risk of them running away or having negative interactions with others. Rather than worrying about your dog running away from its leash, your exotic pet is now safely in your hands.

Customize Your Habitat

Connecting to the previous point, exotic reptiles need a place that has specific heating and lighting needs due to their cold-blooded nature. They also need places to hide in and around, as constant exposure can cause stress. What this means is a fully-customizable habitat where you can let your creativity shine for your reptile. From rocks and boulders to realistic vegetation in the enclosure, it’s more ambitious and fun than simply finding holiday sweaters for your cat.

No Fur? No Problem

Unlike traditional pets like dogs and cats, reptiles do not have fur, which makes it much easier to clean up after. You can say goodbye to stray hairs on your furniture or your clothing before big events. This is perfect for those who are allergic to fur or pet dander but still want something to love. Plus, think of how much money you’ll be saving on grooming products and constant vacuuming!

Small Diet for Small Price

The diet for an exotic reptile is going to depend on the specific species you would have. Some, like geckos, can eat small crickets. Others, like pythons, may be a bit more carnivorous and need creatures such as mice for feeding. Pet owners who prefer the former can save money on food for their exotic creature instead of constantly going to the grocery store for pounds of dry food. Not to mention, you’ll also have a pet who is eating something more natural than pre-made artificial kibbles and bits.

Spend More Time With Your Friend

Getting attached to a pet can be bittersweet. While knowing that you’ll have many years with your animal companion, it can be sad knowing that they will pass on. With exotic reptiles, it can be more sweet than bitter, as their life expectancy far exceeds normal pets. Snakes can live for at least fifteen years, geckos and iguanas into their late teens to early twenties, and turtles can survive for a staggering forty years! Not only will you have an exotic acquaintance for over a decade, but you can pass it on to a family member who is looking to share in the experience, too.

Mellow Moods, But Plenty of Love

Some people like the hustle and energy of dogs, and that is perfectly fine. However, some people may need something more mellow to watch over, whether it is due to age or simply having a calmer personality. No matter what the case may be, owning an exotic reptile can be very low-energy provided that you raise it healthy and safe. This does not mean that they are without personality; on the contrary, they may show more of an affectionate personality given that they are not so expressive with movement.

No Need for Training

You may think that owning a lizard, turtle, snake, or any reptile requires a lot of training, much like you would with dogs or cats. With exotic reptiles, this isn’t always the case, as they do not require obedience commands or potty-training. Not only does this make it less stressful to own a pet, but it can time and money that would’ve been spent with trainers. Your pet reptile will truly be a reflection of you if you treat it kindly and with respect.

From green iguanas to baby leopard turtles and everything in between, owning an exotic reptile can be an experience that other pet owners will miss out on. Stand out from the rest, show your stripes and own an exotic reptile today!

Sources:
www.texvetpets.org/article/reptiles-as-pets
www.reptiles.swelluk.com/blog/advantages-to-having-a-pet-reptile
www.petplace.com/article/reptiles/general/life-expectancy-of-reptiles
www.petmd.com/reptile/care/can-your-reptile-bond-with-you
alohavegasvets.com/2016/05/15/southwest-las-vegas-nv-vet-benefits-pet-reptile

The Comeback Of Vintage Backpacks

backpack

In the late 70's to through the early 90's, backpacks were very fashionable, and to be particular, several designer brands were quite fashionable. Nonetheless, the Coach backpacks seemed to control the market, and that is what your likely to find these days when in the hunt for the best vintage backpack. Nonetheless, you can rarely stumble on or find these types of bags in a brand new condition; they are in economy and thrift stores as second- hand commodities. Nevertheless, you'll be astounded that after all these years; the backpacks are still in good condition and still have the stylish look they had when they were brand new. Therefore, it is worth purchase as it is very affordable even cheaper than a good treat of burger and fries!

Features and Benefits of Vintage Backpacks

Vintage Backpacks are the purses and not the hiking backpacks. Nowadays lots of women are carrying vintage backpacks, and indeed, these backpacks are making a grand comeback, which is for a good reason. Not only are they classy, trendy, and unique, but they are in great conditions and cheap to purchase compared to a price of a new one. Although there are various color choices, most of these bags are British tan, brown, and black. Interestingly, they are simple but robust with substantial hardware and real leather. Further, the compartments are easy and simple to find, the shoulder straps fine tune to any desired length, and most of them have handles that permit you to carry it like a purse.

A majority of these backpacks made of eminence leather, and they are very durable. They are ideal and handy for shopping trips, vacation, and for college student's carrying supplies and books. No need to fret about getting them dirty as they clean up amazingly well because of the high quality and durable leather used. Additionally, they are cheap to purchase, and most ladies prefer them as their "punch bags" and enjoy carrying them!

Advantages of Vintage Backpacks

Since, these backpacks manufactured of leather; they have a better price tag linked to them than other backpacks made from several polyester, artificial mixes, or canvas. Flere are some advantages that you should know and consider when purchasing these backpacks.

Eminent Longevity

Owing to the fact these backpacks are sturdier and stronger than others; they also last for long. Ordinary backpack are long lasting under bulky and extensive use, and also have the capability to wear and tear, and take well the weather conditions. Consequently, they save money, as you do not need to interchange frequently the backpack.

Waterproofed Material

The backpack is weatherproof and waterproof as they have inbuilt leather that can handle these conditions. As these backpacks are manufactured to address any adverse situation, and they have an added safety component that safeguards the content inside the backpack, Flence, these components make the vintage backpack stand out and last for long.

Tough and Resilient

Since they are leather-based backpacks, they are tough and resilient compared to other backpacks manufactured from canvas, polyester, or other artificial mixes. Also, they have the capability to carry bigger weights, as the material is sufficiently pliable. Further, they do not tear or lose their shape, which makes these backpacks exceptional, and a must have than any other type of backpacks!

California Kingsnake

As a child I was enthralled with reptiles, mesmerized by the unending stare of a snake and the myriad geometric patterns and colors of turtle and lizard scales. I would spend hours trekking through nearby fields and streams in search of all things slimy and scaly- a habit I never grew out of. Growing up in the Midwest, species of the western US up until now were encountered only as pictures in books and childhood daydreams. After relocating to the west coast, much of my free-time is spent in the field attempting to catch a glimpse of the native reptile and amphibian species of central California. More recently, I have become interested in identifying and untangling the seemingly unfathomable number of bird species found here on the Central Coast. As I encounter local species of reptiles, amphibians and birds I will be posting pictures of these animal encounters along with interesting natural history facts about each specimen. There is so much beauty within the world to be discovered and appreciated; why not start in one’s own backyard.


calking1

It only took over a year, but the quintessential Californian was finally found! Let’s take a look at arguably one of the most beautiful snakes in the country, the California Kingsnake, Lampropeltis getula californiae. This species is unmistakable in appearance, hosting a pallet of striking contrast, usually of black and white banding in its most familiar phenotype. There are local color variations throughout the range, with sub-populations exhibiting variable hues of chocolate browns and creams. There are even populations of individuals with longitudinal striping rather the more familiar banded pattern. California Kingsnakes are medium-sized, gentle snakes that range throughout the state in a variety of different habitats. When surprised/threatened, they will hiss loudly and quickly vibrate their tail, accomplishing a somewhat surprisingly loud buzzing noise when in contact with loose, dry debris. If the envelope is further pushed, they will hide their head within their coils and expose the bright red mucosal surface of their cloaca with (it is suspected) the intent of drawing attention to the back end while the front end searches for an escape.

calking2

So, why are they called kingsnakes? Welp, these beasts will eat just about anything they come across – lizards, young turtles, birds, a variety of small mammals, large insects, the eggs of lizards and snakes, and even other snakes! Kingsnakes immobilize and dispatch their prey by constriction. California has a variety of snake species- our friend Lampropeltis getula californiae reigns supreme. These guys will even eat rattlesnakes – and if that isn’t macho enough, kingsnakes are immune to rattlesnake venom!

Western Pond Turtle

As a child I was enthralled with reptiles, mesmerized by the unending stare of a snake and the myriad geometric patterns and colors of turtle and lizard scales. I would spend hours trekking through nearby fields and streams in search of all things slimy and scaly- a habit I never grew out of. Growing up in the Midwest, species of the western US up until now were encountered only as pictures in books and childhood daydreams. After relocating to the west coast, much of my free-time is spent in the field attempting to catch a glimpse of the native reptile and amphibian species of central California. More recently, I have become interested in identifying and untangling the seemingly unfathomable number of bird species found here on the Central Coast. As I encounter local species of reptiles, amphibians and birds I will be posting pictures of these animal encounters along with interesting natural history facts about each specimen. There is so much beauty within the world to be discovered and appreciated; why not start in one’s own backyard.


Let’s take a look at the only native species of turtle to the area, Actinemys marmorata, the Western Pond Turtle. Pond turtles are small-medium semiaquatic chelonian species with a rather flat shell shape. Most appear somewhat bland, having a muddy-brown carapace (top shell), a yellowish plastron (bottom shell), and lighter brown appendages/head. There are some beauty queens, however, that display ornate, radiant striping on the carapace and pretty yellow mottling of the arms, legs, and neck. Males will usually have pale-yellow throats and flatter shells while females will have a higher, dome-shaped appearance to the carapace. These little tanks are omnivorous, feeding on aquatic plants, invertebrates, and the occasional frog/fish – the diet of champions!

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Again, these guys are the only species of turtle native to the central coast – any other species of turtle/tortoise found meandering about is either invasive or an escaped pet. Red-eared sliders, an eastern species, have established themselves in many places pretty far from home, including various places in California. Common Snapping turtles, another eastern species, have also made themselves at home in California as well.

Unfortunately, this is the last Central Coast reptile species I have in my arsenal! I suppose we’ll have to change gears and take a look at birds soon. I know, I am heart-broken as well; please stay strong.

Sound a Frog Makes

On the prowl! This guy was found just off of the mean streets of Pismo- up to no good, I imagine.

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Males can be differentiated from females by their vocal sacs, which appear as dark, loose skin over the throat area. A variety of different calls are utilized in the male’s quest for finding love and maintaining his territory – an excellent run-down of the different calls can be found (and heard!) using the link below:

http://www.californiaherps.com/f…/pages/p.sierra.sounds.html

The daytime call, an ugly-sounding, single-noted quack, is a common background noise heard just about anywhere there is shrubbery about. This noise is almost insect-like -easily unassuming of a lurking, well-hidden frog. The advertisement call, however, is a text-book, quintessential ‘ribbit’. In fact, the advertisement call was used as THEE frog voice soundbite in the early days of Hollywood, becoming world-renowned as the ‘sound a frog makes’.

Sierran Treefrog

As a child I was enthralled with reptiles, mesmerized by the unending stare of a snake and the myriad geometric patterns and colors of turtle and lizard scales. I would spend hours trekking through nearby fields and streams in search of all things slimy and scaly- a habit I never grew out of. Growing up in the Midwest, species of the western US up until now were encountered only as pictures in books and childhood daydreams. After relocating to the west coast, much of my free-time is spent in the field attempting to catch a glimpse of the native reptile and amphibian species of central California. More recently, I have become interested in identifying and untangling the seemingly unfathomable number of bird species found here on the Central Coast. As I encounter local species of reptiles, amphibians and birds I will be posting pictures of these animal encounters along with interesting natural history facts about each specimen. There is so much beauty within the world to be discovered and appreciated; why not start in one’s own backyard.


Here we have our most common amphibian species of the area, Pseudacris sierra, the Sierran Treefrog. These little beasts tend to reach a maximum size of about 2 inches or less and come in a variety of colors and patterns that can change in response to temperature and habitat. Regardless of an individual’s chosen garb, the dark ‘mask’ through the eyes and a ‘y’-shaped blotch on the center of the head are nearly always present.

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They are found pretty much anywhere capable of maintaining at least a drop or two of moisture – including downtown Pismo! Treefrogs are a regular inhabitant of my courtyard, and I derive much interest from listening to their calls and observing their patterning, much more so than a normal adult man should. I even occasionally find a frog or two indoors, to which I kindly escort them out. You ain’t helping to pay no rent, freeloader! Sit tight, soon we’ll discuss calls and differentiating males from females.

Western Skink

As a child I was enthralled with reptiles, mesmerized by the unending stare of a snake and the myriad geometric patterns and colors of turtle and lizard scales. I would spend hours trekking through nearby fields and streams in search of all things slimy and scaly- a habit I never grew out of. Growing up in the Midwest, species of the western US up until now were encountered only as pictures in books and childhood daydreams. After relocating to the west coast, much of my free-time is spent in the field attempting to catch a glimpse of the native reptile and amphibian species of central California. More recently, I have become interested in identifying and untangling the seemingly unfathomable number of bird species found here on the Central Coast. As I encounter local species of reptiles, amphibians and birds I will be posting pictures of these animal encounters along with interesting natural history facts about each specimen. There is so much beauty within the world to be discovered and appreciated; why not start in one’s own backyard.


Let’s take a look at a common representative of the Scincidae lizard family that can be found here on the Central Coast, the Western (or Skilton’s) Skink (Plestiodon skiltonianus). While sometimes seen basking, these fast, active little lizards are usually more at-home beneath leaf litter or environmental debris. Western Skinks have a rather aesthetic appearance; their smooth, shiny scales shimmer in the sunlight and the bright, eye-catching electric blue tail is a color rarely encountered in nature. But why would such a small, somewhat delicate lizard want to draw attention to its tail? We will soon find out!

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But first, let’s munch on a few nuggets of natural history: Western Skinks are diurnal lizards that spend much of their time foraging for insects, spiders and other invertebrates. They reach about 2-3 inches in body length (not including the tail) and females typically lay between 2-10 eggs in early summer, diligently guarding them until they hatch approximately 30 days later. During the breeding season, adults will develop a red-orange cast to the head, chin, and tail – much like the specimen pictured here.

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Now, let’s get back to that tail. The tail in many lizards accounts for a significant portion of their body length and is an important aspect of balance, locomotion, and, in some species, fat storage. The tail is, however, also the most likely area of the lizard to be captured by a would-be predator. Many species of lizards across different families have evolved a remarkable defense mechanism, known as caudal autotomy, in which they can essentially break their own tail off! Within the vertebra of the tail are pre-determined fracture planes that work much like the linear perforations of a notebook. When even the slightest amount of pull is applied to the tail, these fracture planes ‘activate’, truncating the tail at the point of restraint.
(https://ispub.com/IJBA/1/2/7729)

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Here we have the spoils of an attempted skink capture. After detachment the muscles of the tail will continue to violently contract, leaving the tail to writhe about for a few minutes. This dramatic flailing of the brightly-colored tail serves as an excellent distraction to the predator as the remainder of the lizard retreats to safety. We can see why, then, this animal would want to draw attention to its tail.

tail